Orange Shirt Day Quotes

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Orange Shirt Day Quotes

Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021, Orange Shirt Day and the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

Orange Shirt Day is born out of the legacy of the St. Joseph Mission residential school commemoration event held in Williams Lake, BC in 2013. It grew out of Phyllis’ story of having her shiny new orange shirt taken away on her first day of school at the Mission and has become an opportunity to keep the discussion on all aspects of residential schools alive annually.

When Phyllis Webstad arrived at St. Joseph’s Mission residential school in British Columbia, they took away her clothes, including her new orange shirt. It was never returned. Orange Shirt Day is a day to recognize the harms of residential school and affirm a commitment that everyone around us matters.

Sept. 30 has been declared Orange Shirt Day annually, in recognition of the harm that the residential school system caused to Indigenous children’s and as an expression of our commitment to reaffirm that every child matters.

 As of June 3, 2021 of this year, a new federal statutory holiday received Royal Assent after it was passed unanimously in the Senate. The first statutory holiday of The National Day of Truth and Reconciliation will be recognized on Sept. 30, 2021, and coincides with Orange Shirt Day.

Please know that our thoughts and condolences are with all those who have suffered and are continuing to suffer from the tragic legacy of the Residential School system. 

Orange Shirt Day

“The residential school experience is one of the darkest, most troubling chapters in our collective history.”

 Justice Murray Sinclair, Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Chairman

 

We wear orange to stand with the Survivors and the Indigenous community.

September 30th, don’t forget to wear an orange shirt (or anything orange, even a ribbon)!

 

September 30 is Orange Shirt Day & the 1st National Day for Truth & Reconciliation. It is a day of learning, reflection & healing.

 

Today, we honour the strength and bravery of residential school survivors and remember the children that never returned

 

We honour the Survivors. We will remember the children who didn’t make it home. Our hearts are heavy but we will fight for a better tomorrow. Our Children Matter

 

We wear orange to remember the Indigenous children who were sent to Residential Schools and never returned, and to honour the Survivors, their families, and their communities

Reflect and consider your personal pledges on how to become a better ally to Indigenous communities. Truth and Reconciliation is a collective journey and I walk with you all.

 

We encourage you to wear orange to remember the lost Indigenous children sent to residential schools and to honour Survivors, their families, and their communities.

 

Today is Orange Shirt Day and the first ever National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. This is a momentous and solemn day to honour and remember the children who attended residential schools.

Let’s wear our orange shirts to honour the strength and resilience of the survivors, those who have perished and reaffirm our commitment, in the spirit of reconciliation, to ensure Every Child Matters.

 

Today and every day: Honour the lives of those lost at residential school and the stories and experiences of survivors and their families. Commit to ongoing learning about the truth and to advocacy for reconciliation and healing.

 

September 30th is Orange Shirt Day and the first National Day for Truth & Reconciliation. Today, we honour our Indigenous communities and those affected by the residential school system; in the spirit of reconciliation and hope for future generations to come

 

We wear orange shirts each Sept 30 to honour the survivors and victims of residential schools. Orange Shirt Day is an opportunity to recognize the trauma and legacy of Canada’s history of residential schools, and also to recommit to reconciliation and dialogue.

 

Today is Orange Shirt Day, also known as the National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. To honour truth, reconciliation, and the healing journeys of all families harmed by Canada’s residential schools, we must continue our work to ensure that all learners are informed and aware.

September 30th is Orange Shirt Day. It’s an important time to have meaningful conversations about the effects of residential schools & their ongoing legacy. On this day, wear orange to show your support for survivors and the countless children who didn’t return home.

 

This Thursday on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, we encourage all to participate in the reconciliation process with open minds and hearts, to take time to listen to the stories of survivors and to reflect in the manner best suited for you.

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